anarra: (Default)
Yesterday I helped with an event.  Starting at 22:00 Friday, teams of contestants had until 18:00 Saturday to make a complete medieval garment from scratch.  OMG I was soooooo dead by the time I got home, and I did not compete!  I just helped the Event Steward!

Here are the rules

Teams could make an outfit from any time period. All three of the teams chose late period garb. No early period stuff so my judging was limited to asking the other judges questions and commenting based on very little knowledge. Sisuile, John and Elizabeth sure know their late period stuff, though!  Brava!

Here are a bunch of photos by Eloise Coulter. Sorry they're on Facebook. I think they're public, though.

And here are more photos by Dawn Carroll (also Facebook).







anarra: (guldguber)
We did finish warping the loom. We've taken it many places since and, Penelope-like, are un-weaving afterwards.  At some point we'll finish this piece and warp up another now that it's not so scary.

The photos below the cut are from the Fiber Festival of New England. Six of us did a demo on Sunday November 2 (and two of us did one the day before, but I wasn't there).  This was our first year at this Festival and we hope to be invited back next year.

The SCA group we do fiber demos with has been invited back permanently to the Connecticut Sheep and Wool Festival. They tell us they plan to put all the demonstrators in a big tent so if it rains everyone is dry!

The Eastern States Exposition (The Big E) has also asked us back. We'll probably demo the first Saturday of the fair.

Lots of Photos below the cut! )
20141102_131508[1]
Side view of the loom, with Ana Ilevna showing how it works.  That's a drop spindle sticking in one of the holes of the loom.

WWL_@_NEFF[1]

And here it is, in all it's warped glory.  Waisting bady. We're still trying to figure out how to stop that.  The soapstone loom weights were generously made by Camma an Daraich.


Ana2_@_NEFF_Demo[1]
Ana Ilevna showing some of Ælfgiva's sprang.  On the table we have sprang, embroidery, quilting, linen fibers for spinning, nålbinding, wool combs, drop spinning and lucet. We also had several tablet weaving looms set up, a wheel spinning linen, and the warp weighted loom along with a small table full of contact information for most of the SCA groups in New England.

AElfgiva_Demo_Sprang_@_NEFF[1]
Ælfgiva demonstrating sprang.

Gwenllian2_@_NEFF[1]
Gwenllian spinning with Ælfgiva nålbinding in the background.

Sarah_@_NEFF[1]
Sarah with her quilting.  Note the quilted overdress!

Henna_Linen_@_NEFF[1]
Henna dressing a distaff with linen.  She spun it all on her wheel during the demo.


I was there, too, but I was taking all the photos!
anarra: (guldguber)
It's time to replace the weaving on our Warp Weighted Loom (WWL).  The SCA has a fiber arts demo at The Big E on September 14th in the New England Center (where they sell the Cream Puffs) and we want to demo weaving on our WWL.

One wants the warps to be evenly spaced to begin the weaving. There are several ways to achieve this; but one of the best ways is to tablet weave a top band and run a supplemental weft that then turns into the warps on the
WWL.

Photos )
anarra: (Default)

Ana Ilevna and I attended the Tir-Mara Crown Principality East Kingdom University on October 5th and 6th. We had a great time. Everyone was extremely hospitable!

For future EKUs, I would recommend that the class listing always be on a web site that is available to everyone. This class listing was not only on Facebook, it was evidently not public and so only available to people with a Facebook login ID. Not even for cool A&S classes will I create another Facebook account after the experience I had with my first one. The class list was evidently added to the EKU web site but it can't have been too much before the event because it wasn't there the last time I tried to find a class listing other than the Facebook one. Magestra Alisay did sent me a preliminary class listing when I asked for one via e-mail.

I also recommend that specific directions from the nearest freeway also be published in the Event Listing both on the EK website (GINGER) and in the Pikestaff. In this case, Mapquest more-or-less worked (aside from trying to send us *South* on Highway 55 instead of North) but having directions from the locals is always good. I e-mailed Magestra Alisay to ask; but specific directions from Highway 40 were not available. (Though a map available from the (French only!) website of the Boy Scout camp helped very much to reassure me that the Mapquest directions from Highway 40 were correct.)

The event announcement was not in the September Pikestaff. As the event was the first Saturday in October, not everyone would have received their Pikestaff even if the directions had been there. This also meant that the event was not as well publicized as it could have been, which was a shame. It was a great event and more participation would have made it even better. Not to mention, great site with beds and showers and all!

The site fees increased by $3 on *August* 15th. As the event announcement wasn't in the August Pikestaff either, we ended up paying $6 more than we could have. We volunteered to teach back in May and would have sent in our check that early had we known of the fee increase in time. As it was, when the event didn't appear in the September Pikestaff, we checked the listing on GINGER. By then it was too late to get the lower site fee.

On to the good stuff:

The classes we attended were well taught. The handouts were informative. The class kits were very well put together and the materials fees were quite reasonable given what the materials were. ($10 for everything to make a 12 signature notebook and $15 for all the fur you needed (and more!) to trim garments.) Both Canadian and American money were accepted, which was a good thing as I foolishly did not change any money before we arrived. (Having decided that all I needed was my Visa card--I utterly forgot about materials fees, silly me!)

Class hand outs were available in both French and English. We sent our handout for our Bayeux Embroidery class to Magestra Alisay de Falaise a month or so ahead of time to be translated into French. This was even more important than for many handouts as half our class is a lecture on the events of 1066 leading up to the Battle of Hastings. The how-to-embroider the Bayeux technique can be taught across a language barrier. The history not so much. There were two people in class who translated into French for the few students who did not know English so all went very well. This was my first experience teaching to students who did not speak any English and I was very happy with the results. I hope they were, too!

If any of you wish to teach in Quebec, Magestra Alisay de Falaise volunteers to translate handouts from English to French. They've evidently been trying for 15 years (!) to find a teacher for pewter casting and glass bead making. There were instructors teaching both all day Saturday and they were inundated with students! Everyone was so very friendly and welcoming that I highly recommend going up to teach. We look forward to going again.

 

I also recommend going up to learn. Baron Cristoforo Donatello dei Visconti taught a very informative class on how to sew fur and use it to trim garments. Ana Ilevna, who also does not speak any French, had no trouble learning all sorts of useful information in his class and I might now get that fur lined cap I've been wishing for all these years. She came away with a bag full of examples and extra fur.

Lady Cellach Donn inghean Mhic an Mhadaigh taught a class on making a Viking pouch with Bayeux style embroidery (that technique was also used in Scandinavia). She also felts. She won the Prince's A&S Championship with a gorgeous felted Mongolian wall hanging and the documentation (in both English and French) to go with it.

I took a class in 16th century Limp Binding (for books) from Seigneur Robin dit Dessaints. The pace of his class was well thought out. He'd done quite a bit of the hole punching and cutting out ahead of time so we could get down to the core of how to stitch it all together. I finished it all in three hours. I believe this was the same person who entered a replica plate, blackwork embroidered book cover and honey-combed gathered shirt in the A&S competition. If so he is a very well talented man! The teaching was very clear and the A&S entries were marvelous.

I cannot remember the name of the woman who won the Princess's Championship. But her entry was a from-the-sheep-up length of woven fabric. She scoured the wool, combed it, dyed it, spun it, and weaved it. Very nice stuff!

The feast was delicious, the hall was beautifully decorated. There were more kinds of muffins than I ever knew existed for both Breakfast and Lunch. (Lady Cellach Donn inghean Mhic an Mhadaigh also baked a lot of the muffins. Very talented woman!) Each of the instructors was given a block-print thank you to take home. There were lovely items for sale in the silent auction for the EK Travel Fund, and all the candlesticks on the feast tables had been hand turned to hold both a candle or a tea light and were for sale for $5 for the Travel Fund.

 

I again highly encourage anyone to consider going up to Tir-Mara to teach and also encourage Tir-Maran's, especially Francophones, to come to the States or the Anglophone areas of the Principality to both learn and teach. Magestra Alisay de Falaise and Baroness Tadea Isabetta di Bruno of l'Ile du Dragon Dormant both volunteer to translate handouts and documentation from French to English.

 

Oh, and the cost of embroidery supplies in Canada is outrageous! We had a swarm snap up every single one of our spare embroidery hoops. A skein of DMC cotton is somewhere around $2 up there! We should organize a Paternayan Airlift or Underground Threadway to get some supplies North for less money.

anarra: (Default)
We will be teaching a class in How to Rig a Viking Faering Boat at the Novice Schola SCA event in Springfield, MA on March 5, 2011.  Our friend Jeff Krug will join us.

Here is the class description:  The anatomy and rigging of a Viking or Norman ship. The Skogar Þrostur is a Viking Faering (four-oared boat) based on the Gokstad faering buried in Norway in the 9th century.  We will demonstrate standing and running rigging, explain construction techniques, steering and navigation.  Class outside (rain or shine - bring an umbrella if it looks like rain, one hour, no class limit.

We will also be teaching the Bayeux Embroidery Technique class I talk about below. 
A combination of lecture on the political and social events leading up to the Battle of Hastings in 1066 and the embroidered tapestry that illustrates it, plus a hands-on lesson in the stem stitch and laid couching embroidery stitches used. Embroider one of the ships from the tapestry. Two hours. Materials fee $1 plus another $1 if you want to buy the wooden embroidery hoop. Class limit 8 for the hands on embroidery portion. Unlimited people can come and listen to the talk.

Novice Schola is put on by the Society for Creative Anachronism (SCA) group in Springfield, MA. It's a day long series of classes in Medieval Arts, Crafts, Sciences and History. There is no fee to be on site and attend the classes, though there may be a materials fee for individual classes. 

There is a "Day Board" for no additional fee (though donations are welcome) which just means a medieval-themed buffet style lunch.  Bring your own plates and silverware.

There is also a medieval feast that evening for $8.00 but only if you pay in advance by February 25th.

The SCA is a participatory group.  All participants are required to wear a "reasonable attempt" at pre-1600 clothing.  The group in Springfield has a lot of medieval clothing available to loan for the day.  There are tubs of loaner clothing available at the check-in desk.  Just ask to borrow some!

As soon as they post a class schedule, I'll update this entry.  Classes in the past have ranged from how to make a book to beginning calligraphy to an overview of Viking Clothing.  I love this event and all it's classes.  And you really don't have to know anything about the SCA or medieval stuff to enjoy it.
anarra: (Default)
On May 8th we went to the Vinland Games SCA event near Harrisburg, PA.  We brought our Viking Faering boat and spent the day talking about Viking boats, Viking history, Viking culture and Viking boats.
 
We had a fantastic time.  There were many other classes besides our Viking Faering class and we attended the “Diet and Nutrition among Celtic, Anglo-Saxon and Viking” class by Lady Ragnveig Snorradottir which was thorough, fascinating, and packed a very dense amount of information into an hour.  
 
Nutritional information from middens, fecal waste, pond pollen, skeletal and dental remains.  Fascinating!  And some of it has relevance even today.  Dental structure changes in developing teeth as babies are weaned from breast milk to cereals with fewer protiens happened back then just as they happen today. She got through all her material clearly and boy did we have to pay attention to so much information in an hour!  Wonderful class.
 
Carowyn Silveroak taught a glass bead class that I couldn't attend, alas. But I saw the beads she made and brought as examples for the students to look at, and what a dizzying variety she's made since I taught a glass bead class in Silver Rylle years ago!  They run the gammut of time periods and techniques.  Lovely work.  She's even been making her own miliflori.
  
The feast and dayboard were delicious!  What a splendid spread.  I was told this was Ketterlyn der Wilde's first feast as head cook and she did a wonderful job.  Day board, the main feast and even a special feast for the "Odin's Table" where spaces were auctioned off to raise money.  Everything was delicious and it all looked well researched for a Viking feast.  And hot, too, despite a problem with the electricity in the kitchen.
  
The people in Blak Rose are friendly and hospitable.  We felt very welcome.  Friderich Swartzwalder autocratted a fun and informative event with great food and lots of activities for everyone.  Huzzah!
anarra: (Default)
On May 8th we, alas! had to miss The Workshop In The Other Room field trip to visit goats and nurseries, because we went to the Vinland Games event in the Shire of Blak Rose.  We brought our Viking Faering boat and spent the day talking about Viking boats, Viking history, Viking culture and Viking boats.
 
We had a fantastic time.  There were many other classes besides our Viking Faering class and we attended the “Diet and Nutrition among Celtic, Anglo-Saxon and Viking” class by Lady Ragnveig Snorradottir which was thorough, fascinating, and packed a very dense amount of information into an hour. 
 
Nutritional information from middens, fecal waste, pond pollen, skeletal and dental remains.  Fascinating!  And some of it has relevance even today.  Dental structure changes in developing teeth as babies are weaned from breast milk to cereals with fewer protiens happened back then just as they happen today. She got through all her material clearly and boy did we have to pay attention to so much information in an hour!  Wonderful class.
 
Carowyn Silveroak taught a glass bead class that I couldn't attend, alas. But I saw the beads she made and brought as examples for the students to look at, and what a dizzying variety she's made since I taught a glass bead class in Silver Rylle years ago!  They run the gammut of time periods and techniques.  Lovely work.  She's even been making her own miliflori.
 
I handed out some fliers with the class schedule for the Daily Life Schola next week (http://www.bbm.eastkingdom.org/Bowmansrest/schola.html). We may get a few people from down there to come--they sounded very interested.
 
The feast and dayboard were delicious!  What a splendid spread.  I was told this was Ketterlyn der Wilde's first feast as head cook and she did a wonderful job.  Day board, the main feast and even a special feast for the "Odin's Table" where spaces were auctioned off to raise money.  Everything was delicious and it all looked well researched for a Viking feast.  And hot, too, despite a problem with the electricity in the kitchen.
 
The site was lovely.  I think it would make a great site for a Crown Tourney or Archery Championship. There are acres of space, an archery range, a playground.  There's an ampheteatre where court can be held.  The hall can hold a feast for about 75 people.  There are even shower stalls.  Parking is a bit tight but I'm sure that can be worked around.  The kitchen is not industrial; but I think Ketterlyn proved that a delicious and hearty feast and dayboard can be made in that space.
 
The people in Blak Rose are friendly and hospitable.  We felt very welcome.  Friderich Swartzwalder autocratted a fun and informative event with great food and lots of activities for everyone.  Huzzah!

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